Induction Ranges with Bridging Zones

Induction range cookers are becoming increasingly popular with modern cooks who love the idea of a range but also crave the convenience of an induction hob. One feature people are increasingly aware of is a bridging zone which spans two zones and allows use of a griddle plate, and this is something range manufacturers are starting to include. We take a look at what is available.

Rangemaster Nexus SE 110 Induction

Power, Control and Flexibility


Cooking on an induction hob is a revelation - instant and immediately controllable power at the touch of a button or the turn of a knob, safe and easy to use and beautifully quick to clean. Gas is still great, and a little cheaper, but ultra-convenient induction is available as an option on almost any range cooker, whether your budget is modest or generous. Generally you get four or five induction zones with the possible addition of a warming area, but customers will often ask us about wok and griddle cooking. A good flat-bottomed wok should work a treat, as would a standard griddle pan, but for the full griddle experience you may need to use two zones in unison, and as the zones are often arranged diagonally this may not be ideal. Better, then, to have a dedicated rectangular area which, as well as being perfect for a large cast iron griddle, can also be used as a general zone for multiple pans. Often referred to as a “bridging zone” this is something that has been found on built-in induction hobs for a while now (there are even some hobs which act as one big induction area, working rather like a cast iron simmer plate), but is an idea that is only now coming onto the range cooker market. Two excellent brands at either end of the mid-market spectrum have taken the lead…

Belling


First to market was perennial favourite family brand Belling, which introduced their latest

Farmhouse

and

Cookcentre

ranges in 2017 and included a feature they call Link+ on their induction models. Belling are famously good value, of course, and their induction ranges start at
£1095
* for their Farmhouse 90Ei, up to
£1425
* for the Farmhouse 110Ei. Belling 100 and 110 models feature two rectangular Link+ areas plus a central induction zone; 90cm models give you two Link+ areas plus a warming area on the right - all controlled via touch controls on the hob surface. This tidies up the control facia nicely, and is so safe and easy to use.

Belling Induction Link+
love_it_centred


Rangemaster


Market-leading brand Rangemaster are now adopting the bridging zone idea on their latest-issue Nexus SE 110 (
£2975
*), Elan Deluxe 90 (
£2645
*) and Elan Deluxe 110 (
£2895
*) models, and our guess is that they will probably roll it out across other existing models in due course, making it the standard on the Deluxe format. With the rectangular bridging zone on the left and three standard circular zones centre and right, Rangemaster utilise rotary controls rather than touch screen. As a nice extra touch Rangemaster also include a ribbed cast iron griddle plate.

Rangemaster G5 Mk2 induction
love_it_centred

We hope and expect to see more ranges coming onto the market with bridging zone induction hobs - there certainly seems to be a desire for them, and these early entries will surely fuel that desire. Induction is already very up-and-coming within the range cooker industry, as people’s needs evolve towards convenience and away from what one might call authenticity. A range is a stunning addition to a kitchen, and there is no shame in doing away with the chore of keeping a gas hob nice and clean, plus the process of cooking on induction is a very pleasant one. If you have not yet discovered it, perhaps you should give it a try.







*Prices as at Sept 2018